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  #41  
Old 11-01-2019, 06:38 PM
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Paulie would obviously hire a wet nurse in addition to a nanny. Us lot (or is it we lot???)...
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We had one when we were at the hospital after my wifes c-section (we stayed for 3 days).
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Old 11-01-2019, 06:57 PM
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Lactation Consultant

We had one when we were at the hospital after my wifes c-section (we stayed for 3 days).
For someone judging other womenís rights to choose formula feeding, a c-section seems like an interesting choice.
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Old 11-01-2019, 06:59 PM
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For someone judging other womenís rights to choose formula feeding, a c-section seems like an interesting choice.
Easier to schedule the birth/nurse/nanny when you know the exact day.

Plus, in Brazil it is very common (in Europe it is not).
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Old 11-01-2019, 07:01 PM
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Easier to schedule the birth/nurse/nanny when you know the exact day.

Plus, in Brazil it is very common (in Europe it is not).
Iím very well versed in the c-section issues with Brazil.

So those health risks for the baby are hand waived away while formula risks arenít?
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Old 11-01-2019, 07:06 PM
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Iím very well versed in the c-section issues with Brazil.

So those health risks for the baby are hand waived away while formula risks arenít?
Sure.
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Old 11-02-2019, 07:42 AM
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I have a feeling motives other than scheduling are involved re: C-sections when it's not really needed. (for my own, D had crammed his foot somewhere it shouldn't have been. They had to check his leg for twisting after he came out.)

Because if it's so important to schedule, then bottle-feeding makes a hell of a lot more sense. The kid gets born only once, but has to be fed every day.
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Old 11-02-2019, 08:14 AM
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I have a feeling motives other than scheduling are involved re: C-sections when it's not really needed. (for my own, D had crammed his foot somewhere it shouldn't have been. They had to check his leg for twisting after he came out.)
In a lot of countries, yes, but in Brazil for example, over 80% of births in private hospitals are done via c-section. Hereís an interesting article about it. Thereís a ton of other stuff out there. My first intro to the phenomenon was on the documentary ďThe Business of Being BornĒ and I have been interested in it ever since.
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Old 11-02-2019, 09:25 AM
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Given it's the country that gave us the Brazilian.... ahem, I was indirectly referring to trying to avoid certain consequences of vaginal birth, which I believe is a bigger motive than scheduling quibbles.

For one, I never heard the Brazilian culture was heavily calendar/clock-driven. But I could be wrong about that.
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Old 11-02-2019, 09:27 AM
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Reading that article from The Atlantic, I can totally get it being for the doctors' convenience and higher profit.
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Old 11-02-2019, 01:09 PM
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My family's guideline was that you breastfeed until the kid bites your nipple.
I had to stop before that with both kids. I ran dry with one (I left the pump at my mom's, and she was very slow to return it, in large part because she didn't believe in pumping, and thought it was too rough on my, physically.) and I got sick and had to take some drug I didn't want to give to the baby with the other. But he was about 9 months old. I supplemented both with formula, because I was working and had trouble producing enough milk. I felt no guilt about that, because as best as I can tell, almost all the benefits of breast milk can be gotten if you kid is getting half-and-half. And "has enough to eat without driving mom nuts" is a huge benefit, one I had enough self confidence to recognize.

Also, one of the moms in my new mother's group nearly starved her newborn because she was trying too hard to breastfeed. Fortunately, her mother visited, and found a hungry, dangerously dehydrated baby and a mom so sleep deprived as to be hallucinating. She brought them both to the hospital. The mom was admitted, and grandma took the newborn home with a bottle and some formula, possibly saving two lives. That really drove home to me the dangers of the "breast is always best" movement.

I think part of the "breast is best" emotional energy comes from the general feeling that women OUGHT to spend all their time with babies, and not do things that take them away from their children, like working in offices. Because it's pretty challenging to nurse full time while working away from the home for 8 or 9 hours a day.

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...Of all the loud-mouthed proponents causing more harm than good to parents, I think the co-sleeping folks bother me the most. One such person teaching a parenting class at a hospital tried to tell us that "nobody ever really smooshes their baby in their sleep." I'm shocked the hospital had them speak. Fortunately, that same hospital brought in another speaker the following week who said, "Um, yes, some babies are suffocated by their parents rolling over on them, and it's the most tragic thing in the world to have to tell those parents that you couldn't save their baby."
When I had kids, the medical establishment was aggressively anti-co-sleeping, which I think is also harmful. When my babies were new, I was hyper-aware of what was in my bed, and I'd wake up in a cold sweat afraid I was on top of my child if there was a wrinkle in the sheet. Literally. It was like being the princess with the pea. Oh -- and this was true despite the fact that I never slept with the kid. It was just some reflex that got triggered. But I'm certain it would have been safe for me to sleep with my babies.
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