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  #51  
Old 02-18-2010, 03:42 PM
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Hugh Jass Hugh Jass is offline
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It's estimated in 4.5 billion years. The sun may not be gone by then, but it will be large enough that Earth may be swallowed up by it. If not swallowed the planet would absolutely be uninhabitable.
yeah, that's what I was basically saying
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  #52  
Old 02-18-2010, 03:44 PM
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The galaxy's merging would probably go mostly unnoticed. A few stars will probably hit each other, and by a few I mean less than 10, out of hundreds of billions. The chances that our solar system is affected is remote.

I'd say the greatest danger is a massive solar flare destroying the electric grid. If we shut the grids down when you know it's coming we should be fine, except for the sattelites, but I fear people under-reacting and not turning off the grids.
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  #53  
Old 02-18-2010, 03:45 PM
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http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/35449037...science-space/

In a separate 1a supernova story, they might need to split them into two classes. The underlying mechanics may reduce the confidence in their use as "standard candles".
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  #54  
Old 02-18-2010, 03:45 PM
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Older stars move further apart. The nearest star is 4 ly away. During the stellar nursery phase there were probably at least 100 stars within that radius. We should continue to become more isolated I think.

The time limit is apparently 1 billion years. 5 billion is the limit on the sun, but I read that in 1 billion the sun will be warmer and life on Earth will not be possible.

I fully expect to be dead before I need to care about any of this, unless they perfect that no dying thing.
I wonder about that. Surely galaxies are moving farther apart from each other, but the contents of any particular galaxy stay within that galaxy, regardless of the expansion of the universe. So I imagine if this star moves further away it will be due to moving to a different area of our galaxy, not because of universal expansion.

Although if Dark Matter does continue to accelerate the expansion, eventually Galaxies would be ripped apart, then solar systems, then planets, then atoms, and so on.
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Old 02-18-2010, 03:46 PM
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Originally Posted by ElDucky View Post
The galaxy's merging would probably go mostly unnoticed. A few stars will probably hit each other, and by a few I mean less than 10, out of hundreds of billions. The chances that our solar system is affected is remote.

I'd say the greatest danger is a massive solar flare destroying the electric grid. If we shut the grids down when you know it's coming we should be fine, except for the sattelites, but I fear people under-reacting and not turning off the grids.
even if nothing in our solar system crashes with anything from andromeda, wouldn't the gravitional forces possibly rip planets out of orbit?
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Old 02-18-2010, 03:47 PM
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Originally Posted by ElDucky View Post
The galaxy's merging would probably go mostly unnoticed. A few stars will probably hit each other, and by a few I mean less than 10, out of hundreds of billions. The chances that our solar system is affected is remote.

I'd say the greatest danger is a massive solar flare destroying the electric grid. If we shut the grids down when you know it's coming we should be fine, except for the sattelites, but I fear people under-reacting and not turning off the grids.
True the galaxy collision is less threatening.

The problem with solar flares is that, like a supernova, you won't have any advance warning. When we see the flare, any radiation arrives simultaneously. Although there are some delayed effects that follow a solar flare. Are those effects the ones that affect electric grids?
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Old 02-18-2010, 03:49 PM
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even if nothing in our solar system crashes with anything from andromeda, wouldn't the gravitional forces possibly rip planets out of orbit?
That was my thought as well. Another star from andromeda doesn't have to literally collide with any planet or our sun, but if it got close enough to our solar system it could easily disrupt orbits. And Earth's orbit doesn't have to be disrupted much to make life unsustainable.
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  #58  
Old 02-18-2010, 03:51 PM
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Supposedly we have a supernova due in our galaxy sometime very soon. The last one was during Galileo's time. For a little while, it will supposedly be as bright as the moon. Pretty cool. Unless it is one that destroys our ozone.
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Old 02-18-2010, 03:53 PM
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True the galaxy collision is less threatening.

The problem with solar flares is that, like a supernova, you won't have any advance warning. When we see the flare, any radiation arrives simultaneously. Although there are some delayed effects that follow a solar flare. Are those effects the ones that affect electric grids?
The radiation doesn't do much. It's the charged particles. They take a few days to reach us so we would have plenty of warning.
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Old 02-18-2010, 03:55 PM
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Originally Posted by ElDucky View Post
The galaxy's merging would probably go mostly unnoticed. A few stars will probably hit each other, and by a few I mean less than 10, out of hundreds of billions. The chances that our solar system is affected is remote.

I'd say the greatest danger is a massive solar flare destroying the electric grid. If we shut the grids down when you know it's coming we should be fine, except for the sattelites, but I fear people under-reacting and not turning off the grids.
Eh, may not be as true as you think. Collision has a very low probability, but orbits would almost certainly be destroyed. Think about it like this, right now, our entire solar system is rotating around the massive center of the Milky Way Galaxy. When we hit the Andromeda Galaxy, our solar system will start rotating around not one, but two centers. That alone could do enough to the orbits in our solar system to produce catastrophic results.
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