Actuarial Outpost
 
Go Back   Actuarial Outpost > Cyberchat > Non-Actuarial Topics
FlashChat Actuarial Discussion Preliminary Exams CAS/SOA Exams Cyberchat Around the World Suggestions


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #41  
Old 02-18-2010, 03:26 PM
ElDucky's Avatar
ElDucky ElDucky is online now
Free Mason
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: In a van, down by the river
Studying for Let me worry about blank
Favorite beer: Trappistes Rochefort 8
Posts: 44,648
Default

Is it the gamma rays that would destroy the ozone? If so they ya, it would get here the same time we know about it. If there's some high speed particles involved, then they would only move about 99% as fast.
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 02-18-2010, 03:27 PM
Hugh Jass's Avatar
Hugh Jass Hugh Jass is offline
frequent poster
SOA
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Omega Centaurus
Studying for exam 97
College: Phoenix On-Line
Favorite beer: TC-17x97
Posts: 27,241
Blog Entries: 6
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dschobel View Post
The information that the supernova occured would reach us at the same time as any radiation since they both travel at the speed of light. In other words as soon as we see it, it's here. The articles mention the star is 3,260 light years away, so if it did happen now, we wouldn't know for 3,260 years.
ok, that's what I thought. It sure stinks that it could have happened 3259 years ago and we're doomed next year.
__________________
Quote:
PS...I'm sorry for being a bit crass, please don't ban me.
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 02-18-2010, 03:30 PM
dschobel dschobel is offline
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Princeton Junction
College: Rutgers University Alumnus
Posts: 1,553
Default

A very valid point though is the position of our solar system relative to this star if and when it does go supernova. Perhaps at that time we will be 10,000 light years away, and the effects will be greatly reduced. Of course things could go the other way and it could be closer, in which case we're really in trouble. Needless to say the time scales involved are still far greater than any of our lifetimes, but it does possibly put a shorter time limit for humans to find another planet. The other time limit being when our sun swells up in 5 billion years or so.
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 02-18-2010, 03:32 PM
dschobel dschobel is offline
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Princeton Junction
College: Rutgers University Alumnus
Posts: 1,553
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hugh Jass View Post
ok, that's what I thought. It sure stinks that it could have happened 3259 years ago and we're doomed next year.
Yup, but if that's the case we have no way to know and it would be over so fast we probably wouldn't know what hit us.
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 02-18-2010, 03:33 PM
dschobel dschobel is offline
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Princeton Junction
College: Rutgers University Alumnus
Posts: 1,553
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ElDucky View Post
Is it the gamma rays that would destroy the ozone? If so they ya, it would get here the same time we know about it. If there's some high speed particles involved, then they would only move about 99% as fast.
Yeah the fear is that the gamma rays emitted from the supernova would be too concentrated at this range and would destroy our ozone.
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 02-18-2010, 03:33 PM
Hugh Jass's Avatar
Hugh Jass Hugh Jass is offline
frequent poster
SOA
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Omega Centaurus
Studying for exam 97
College: Phoenix On-Line
Favorite beer: TC-17x97
Posts: 27,241
Blog Entries: 6
Default

does anyone have a map of the portion of our galaxy showing our position and the position of this other star?
__________________
Quote:
PS...I'm sorry for being a bit crass, please don't ban me.
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 02-18-2010, 03:37 PM
dschobel dschobel is offline
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Princeton Junction
College: Rutgers University Alumnus
Posts: 1,553
Default

The wikipedia article gives a rough location of the star relative to our location. I'm sure some astronomer somewhere is busy figuring out whether this star is moving towards us or away from us.

On a side note, another cosmic disaster I forgot about is our collision with the Andromeda Galaxy. It would be very easy for Earth's orbit to be disrupted by this event that the planet could be flung into empty space.
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 02-18-2010, 03:39 PM
ElDucky's Avatar
ElDucky ElDucky is online now
Free Mason
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: In a van, down by the river
Studying for Let me worry about blank
Favorite beer: Trappistes Rochefort 8
Posts: 44,648
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dschobel View Post
A very valid point though is the position of our solar system relative to this star if and when it does go supernova. Perhaps at that time we will be 10,000 light years away, and the effects will be greatly reduced. Of course things could go the other way and it could be closer, in which case we're really in trouble. Needless to say the time scales involved are still far greater than any of our lifetimes, but it does possibly put a shorter time limit for humans to find another planet. The other time limit being when our sun swells up in 5 billion years or so.
Older stars move further apart. The nearest star is 4 ly away. During the stellar nursery phase there were probably at least 100 stars within that radius. We should continue to become more isolated I think.

The time limit is apparently 1 billion years. 5 billion is the limit on the sun, but I read that in 1 billion the sun will be warmer and life on Earth will not be possible.

I fully expect to be dead before I need to care about any of this, unless they perfect that no dying thing.
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 02-18-2010, 03:39 PM
Hugh Jass's Avatar
Hugh Jass Hugh Jass is offline
frequent poster
SOA
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Omega Centaurus
Studying for exam 97
College: Phoenix On-Line
Favorite beer: TC-17x97
Posts: 27,241
Blog Entries: 6
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dschobel View Post
The wikipedia article gives a rough location of the star relative to our location. I'm sure some astronomer somewhere is busy figuring out whether this star is moving towards us or away from us.

On a side note, another cosmic disaster I forgot about is our collision with the Andromeda Galaxy. It would be very easy for Earth's orbit to be disrupted by this event that the planet could be flung into empty space.
THat won't happen for a while, long after our own sun dies, right?
__________________
Quote:
PS...I'm sorry for being a bit crass, please don't ban me.
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 02-18-2010, 03:41 PM
dschobel dschobel is offline
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Princeton Junction
College: Rutgers University Alumnus
Posts: 1,553
Default

It's estimated in 4.5 billion years. The sun may not be gone by then, but it will be large enough that Earth may be swallowed up by it. If not swallowed the planet would absolutely be uninhabitable.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:06 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
*PLEASE NOTE: Posts are not checked for accuracy, and do not
represent the views of the Actuarial Outpost or its sponsors.
Page generated in 0.23749 seconds with 10 queries